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Talk To Frank

About Talk To Frank

The longest running anti-drug campaign in the UK is Talk to Frank. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. A sort of comedy was also brought into the message in the bid to pass it appropriately.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. Also, there's no sign that Frank is a government agent - something that is rare in the history of campaigns paid for by government.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. For example, in Singapore, a recent campaign recently told young people, "You play, you pay."

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. A few people might have stayed around for the animation's end to discover more regarding the undesirable effects. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. A total of 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and a total of 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. It is evidence that the method is effective.

Yet, similar to each other anti-drugs media battle on the planet, there is no proof Frank has ceased individuals consuming drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. FRANK has run lots of media campaigns on radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs:

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email help
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • Help in finding a rehab and treatment facility